Myopia

Myopia is reaching epidemic levels in some parts of the world1-8

Myopia Has Been Steadily Increasing in Prevalence:1-8

  • Over 30% prevalence in the United States and Europe with U.S. prevalence almost doubling in 30 years
  • 80%-90% prevalence across Asia

Long-term Implications Are Clear:1-8

  • Myopia increases the risk of ocular diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma, choroidal retinal degeneration, retinal detachment and potentially, blindness
  • Emotional stress of children and parents as the prescription continues to increase

The VTI Multifocal lens design has been shown to impact three known visual risk factors for myopia:

  • Lag of accommodation
  • Amplitude of accommodation
  • Peripheral hyperopia

Key Study Findings:9-15

  • Animal (chick) data achieved 100% suppression of myopic development up to -10.00D.
  • Human pilot data indicated excellent vision at all distances, the lenses were likely to be worn without issue by children, and decreased accommodative and peripheral hyperopic visual risk factors.

CLICK BELOW to view VTI’s publications:

Myopia Progression Control (MPC) Lens Design Reverses Previously Induced Myopia in Chicks

Comparison of Three Power Levels of A Novel Soft Contact Lens Optical Design to Reduce Suspected Risk Factors for the Progression of Juvenile Onset Myopia

Feasibility Testing of a Novel SCL Optical Design to Reduce Suspected Risk Factors for the Progression of Juvenile Onset Myopia

Inhibition of Defocus-Induced Myopia in Chickens

Children's Evaluation of a Unique Myopia Progression Control Lens Design

The Effect of a Unique Lens Designed for Myopia Progression Control (MPC) on the Level of Induced Myopia in Chicks

Controlling Lens Induced Myopia in Chickens with Peripheral Lens Design

 

References: 1. Vitale S, Sperduto R, Ferris F. Increased Prevalence Of Myopia In The United States Between 1971-1972 and 1999-2004. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2009;127(12);1632-1639. 2. Morgan I, Ohno-Matsui K, Saw S. Myopia. The Lancet. 2012;379:1739-1748. 3. Chen T. Myopia epidemic sets off alarm bells. The Wall Street Journal. May 12, 2012. 4. Myopia: Prevention and Control. Retrieved November 25, 2014, from http://myopiaprevention.org/. 5. Heiting G. Why Myopia Progression Is a Concern. Retrieved November 25, 2014, from http://www.allaboutvision.com/. 6. Pierson D. China's myopia epidemic comes into focus. Los Angeles Times. July 5, 2012. 7. Park A. Why Up To 90% of Asian Schoolchildren Are Nearsighted. Time Magazine. May 7, 2012. 8. Kiang KH. First Singapore Eye Research Institute. International Meeting, September 28, 2001. 9. Irving E, Yakobchuk-Stanger C.  Amer. Acad. of Opt. 2014 AAO ID: P01 10. Dillehay S, Woods J, Situ P, Payor R, Griffin R, Tyson M, Jones L. Comparison of Three Power Levels of a Novel Soft Contact Lens Optical Design to Reduce Suspected Risk Factors for the Progression of Juvenile Onset Myopia. ARVO Poster, 3637; Poster #A0086.  11. Payor R, Woods J, Fonn D, situ P, Dillehay S, Griffin R, Tyson M, Jones L.  Feasibility Testing of a Novel SCL Optical Design to Reduce Suspected Risk Factors for the Progression of Juvenile Onset Myopia. Invest Opthalmol Vis Sci 2014;55: E-abstract 3638.  12. Woods J, Guthrie S, Keir N, Dillehay S, Tyson M, Griffin R, Irving E. Inhibition of Defocus-Induced Myopia in Chickens. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. 2013;54(4):2662-2668. 13. Miller J, Long B, Dillehay S. Children’s Evaluation of a Unique Myopia Progression Control Lens Design. Vol. 115896. 14. Woods J, Guthrie S, Keir N, Dillehay S, Tyson M, Griffin R, Jones L, Irving E. The Effect of a Unique Lens Designed for Myopia Progression Control (MPC) on the Level of Induced Myopia in Chicks.  Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52: E-abstract 6651.  15.  Guthrie S, Irving E, Dillehay S, Keir N, Jones L.  Controlling Lens induced Myopia in Chickens with Peripheral Lens Design.  Amer. Acad. of Optom. 2011 Vol. 110421.